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Give it a GO … Morris Dancing

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Date:
April 30
Time:
7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
Event Category:
Website:
www.raggedcrow.

Ragged Crow Morris Dancers are running a series of workshops to introduce you to one of the oldest continuing English traditions. No one knows where morris dancing originated, all that can be said is that it is very old and has had many influences.
Ragged Crow dance two different morris traditions; one from the Cotswold region based on dances that were collected in the early 20th century and one from the Welsh Border region which are mainly contemporary dances based on an old tradition.
Morris dancing is not a competitive dance, we enjoy ‘strutting our stuff’ so we only dance in public when we know that we can put on a great performance.
If you have a sense of rhythm, a sense of humour and enjoy good company why not Give it a Go at our series of workshops on April 30, May 7 and 14.

At the end of the workshop series there may be an opportunity to join Ragged Crow.

A little more history! ENGLISH MORRIS DANCING! WHERE DOES IT COME FROM?
The earliest Morris records are from the time of Henry VII King of England (1500), and were used mainly at Court masques and entertainment.
From the Court it seems to have spread into popular entertainment, rst in large houses, then to village celebrations, where it became associated with Church Ales and other seasonal festivities. Before the fteenth century? Who knows? The revival in Morris dancing in the 1900s was prompted by work done by Mary Neal and Cecil Sharp at the beginning of the 20th century, they collected and wrote down the music and dances from old dancers, this created the foundation for modern morris dancing. Dierent villages had their own dances which were passed through the centurys, some were lost but many saved by the work of Neal, Sharp and others.

RAGGED CROW DANCE TWO FORMS OF MORRIS DANCING
Cotswold morris: dances from an area mostly in Gloucestershire and Oxfordshire mainly based on old dances collected in the early 20th century. They are normally danced with handkerchiefs or sticks to accompany the hand movements. Dances usually for 6 or 8 dancers, but solo and duo dances (known as single or double jigs) also occur.

Border Morris: based on a tradtion from the English-Welsh border: a simpler, looser, more vigorous style, most of the dances we do are contemporary dances created by todays border sides.

Enquiries contact: [email protected]

For bookings: [email protected]